Govan Partick bridgeThe regeneration of the banks of the river Clyde, including plans for a new bridge linking Partick and Govan, has moved forward after Glasgow City Council gave its approval to finalising legal agreements with Peel Holdings Limited.

The proposals are part of the Glasgow City Region City Deal and include developing further up the river towards Glasgow Harbour to connect two decades of developments like the SEC, the Riverside Museum and Pacific Quay across the water, as well as refurbishing the existing ‘Smartie Tube’ bridge from Finnieston to the SEC and Hydro.

Yesterday the council’s executive committee agreed the way forward to successful working between the council and its waterfront partners on the projects.

One of the key stakeholders in the development of waterfront sites is Peel Holdings Limited (PHL), who have a significant land holding there.

There are a number of issues to be resolved around some of PHL’s sites on the Clyde that after their resolution will allow the council to progress City Deal funded infrastructure and unlock vacant sites for development.

One such example of these issues being resolved through a legal agreement would be the Partick – Govan bridge crossing to the Glasgow Harbour site on the north banks of the Clyde (if a feasibility study show this to be the preferred location) with PHL constructing a bridge across the river Kelvin between Glasgow Harbour and the Riverside Museum.

Councillor Susan Aitken, leader of Glasgow City Council and City Convener for Inclusive Economic Growth, said: “(This) decision by the council marks another step forward in the regeneration of the Clyde.  There will be some fantastic projects transforming the waterfront over the next few years, bringing jobs and investment to the area to fulfil its enormous potential, and reconnecting communities with all the social and economic benefits that will bring.”

The council appointed global engineering consultancy CH2M Hill to undertake design of a new bridge between Govan and Partick in February with work expected to begin in 2019.