Peter McAninch laying the first bricks in Bertha Park

Springfield lays foundations for new community at Bertha Park

Springfield Properties has laid the first-set of blocks for the initial phase of homes at its 3,000-home development at Bertha Park in Perth.

Bricklayer Peter McAninch had the honour of securing what will be the first of the millions of blocks required to build the village.

As well as new homes, Bertha Park, just off the Inveralmond Roundabout, will include all the facilities needed for a community to thrive. It will be home to the first purpose built school in Scotland for decades, and offer business opportunities, office spaces, shops and healthcare facilities. Each of the new homes will also be fitted with the cabling needed for householders to easily install charging points for electric vehicles.

Infrastructure work commenced on the new village in September 2017. With drainage in place and roads starting to take shape, work has begun on the homes overlooking the pond in the first phase.

 

Dundee walking and cycling infrastructure investment

A six-figure investment in the city’s walking and cycling infrastructure is on the path to completion.

More than £356,000 has been identified for new surfacing and a boundary fence on a stretch of shared use path through Dundee Dock.

A recent agreement between Dundee City Council and Forth Ports opens up access through the harbour area via the path.

Now councillors are to be asked to approve a bid for the work from Jones Bros. of Ruthin, North Wales.

Forming part of the National and North Sea cycle routes and also the local Green Circular the path is popular with walkers and cyclists.

Funding for the works is coming from various sources including TACTRAN and the European Regional Development Fund.

If the city development committee agrees the tender at its meeting on Monday April 23 work could start in May and be finished by the height of summer.

 

Bute House repairs and conservation compete

Restoration to parts of Bute House, the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, has now been completed.

The premises return to full operation as a working government building when it hosts the Scottish Cabinet meeting on Tuesday.

The conservation work, co-ordinated by Historic Environment Scotland, began in October after routine monitoring revealed urgent ceiling repairs were required to the category A-listed Georgian building, part of Edinburgh’s New Town World Heritage site.

Extensive work was carried out to stabilise and retain the ornate plaster ceiling in the drawing room – the main public reception room in the building – and strengthen the floors above.

Both traditional techniques and modern materials were used in the repairs, which have preserved for the future the unique features of the building, including the cantilevered stone staircase.

Maintenance and modernisation work also took place while Bute House was closed. This included repairing faulty ventilation systems, installing heating for the first time throughout the whole building, and refurbishing the toilet facilities.

The costs of repairs and the associated works were as follows:

  • Building restoration, enabling works and maintenance – £504,216
  • Alternative accommodation arrangements for the First Minister – £19,220 (inclusive of £11,008 rent)

 

Dundee school improvement works

More than £1.1 million worth of improvements to school buildings in Dundee are to be considered by councillors next week.

Dundee City Council’s city development committee is being asked to approve tenders for work to five city schools which will be carried out during the summer holidays.

The council’s contract services division is in line for the work to:

  • refurbish the roof at Clepington PS;
  • upgrade a home economics classroom at Craigie HS;
  • replace windows and door screens at Forthill PS;
  • upgrade toilets at Craigiebarns PS; and
  • replace fire doors and a new swipe entry system at Eastern PS.

Dundee City Council’s city development committee meets on Monday (April 23).