BAM

BAM considered a perfect fit for Edinburgh Airport

BAM Construction has been awarded a £10m contract to fit-out the new terminal extension at Edinburgh Airport.

Once complete the new three storey terminal building will provide expanded domestic and international arrival facilities including baggage reclaim, border control, additional food/beverage outlets, expanded lounge space and new office accommodation at Scotland’s busiest airport.

At the start of 2017 BAM was appointed to deliver the first phase of the terminal expansion project which forms part of a wider £80m investment in the airport.

Work on the project is already well underway with the new terminal building due to open in late 2018.

Bruce Dickson, regional director at BAM Construction, said: “This is an exciting and significant project and we are delighted to be part of the team delivering it.  All airport users will benefit from an enhanced travelling experience befitting Edinburgh’s standing as a global business and tourist destination.”

Ian Lang, capital director at Edinburgh Airport, added: “As Edinburgh Airport continues to grow it’s important we provide infrastructure that is fit for purpose and meets the needs of passengers and our airline partners whilst maintaining day to day operations. BAM Construction understand and share our focus on that and we are happy to extend that partnership as we further enhance passenger facilities at Scotland’s busiest airport.”

September opening date for Dundee’s £80m V&A museum

Architect Kengo Kuma during a visit to the V&A Museum last year

Dundee’s £80.1 million V&A Museum of Design will open its doors to the public for the first time on September 15, it was revealed today.

Designed by Kengo Kuma, the Japanese architect who also designed the Tokyo 2020 Olympic stadium, and being developed by BAM Construction, the project is only the second V&A museum anywhere outside of London.

Since construction started in April 2015, key milestones achieved include the completion of a coffer dam which enabled the foundation construction for the part of the building that will sit out over the Tay, groundworks on the former reclaimed dock site, piling for the ground source heating system and remodelling of the river wall.

Kengo Kuma visited the project in October, shortly after the removal of the coffer dam, as he saw his vision inspired by Scotland’s cliffs revealed for the first time.

The museum’s first visiting exhibition from the V&A London will be Ocean Liners: Speed and Style, which explores the design of some of the world’s most famous ships including The Titanic, Normandie, the Queen Mary and the Canberra.

Announcing the opening date this morning, V&A Dundee director, Philip Long, said: “After many years of planning for V&A Dundee, we are absolutely thrilled to announce the date of the new museum’s opening.

“In just eight months we will be opening the doors and welcoming our first visitors. V&A Dundee is set to be a vital new cultural organisation for Dundee, the UK and beyond, helping to change understanding of just how important design and creativity are to people’s lives. We are enormously grateful to all our supporters for helping to make this happen.

“V&A Dundee brings something new to Scotland. It is the country’s first museum dedicated to design, which visitors will be able to experience and get involved with in very many ways.

“Particularly important is that the new museum enables major V&A exhibitions to be seen more widely by more people across the UK.

“So I am especially excited that part of V&A Dundee’s opening programme will be the breath-taking exhibition Ocean Liners: Speed & Style, the first of many ambitious exhibitions at V&A Dundee that will show how our lives have been – and always will be – shaped by design.”

Council agrees plans to build intergenerational campus in Jedburgh

Scottish Borders Council has agreed to proposals to build an intergenerational learning campus in Jedburgh and formally close the existing nursery, primary, secondary and specialist provision in the town.

Stallan-Brand Architects, working alongside the council, hub South EastBAM and TGP, are set to deliver a 434 -space primary, 550 pupil secondary and a nursery to replace outdated existing facilities in the town.

A statutory consultation on the plans was undertaken between 8 May to 18 June 2017, with feedback received incorporated into a report that was approved by the council’s executive in November 2017.

The proposal will result in the permanent closure of Jedburgh Grammar as well as the nursery and primary provisions at Howdenburn and Parkside schools.

Howdenburn Schoolhouse will also be closed and the educational support for secondary aged pupils with additional support needs transferred to the new campus.

The school catchment zones for Howdenburn Primary, Parkside Primary and Jedburgh Grammar will be rezoned to the new campus. This will also be the case for the Ancrum Primary P6 and P7 pupils who currently transition to Parkside.

Councillor Carol Hamilton, Scottish Borders Council’s executive member for children and young people, said: “I am delighted that we now have full agreement to these proposals and can progress with our plans to create this unique and much anticipated replacement school provision for Jedburgh with the educational opportunities that it has potential to provide for people of all ages.

“There has been extensive consultation and public engagement throughout the process as it was important to make sure that pupils, family members, staff and the wider Jedburgh community were fully engaged with the proposals. We would like thank everyone who took part for their responses and the support we have received. We now look forward to working together and making this vision a reality.”

The Scottish Government has been informed of the council’s decision and now has an eight week period of further consideration. Members of the public are also entitled to submit any further representations directly to the Scottish Government during the three week period from Thursday 21 December to Wednesday 10 January 2018.

BAM wins £18m deal to deliver new Glasgow schools

Blairdardie Primary School

Blairdardie Primary School

BAM Construction has been appointed by hub West Scotland to build two new primary schools on behalf of Glasgow City Council.

Located on Liberton Street in the East of the city and on Kearn Avenue in the West End, Carntyne and Blairdardie Primary Schools will provide modern state of the art teaching facilities for local children, which, in the case of Carntyne, will include a multi-use games area that will be available for community use.

Designed by Holmes Miller, both projects commenced on site last month with completion of Carntyne scheduled for Autumn 2018 and Blairdardie following in Spring 2019.

The combined contract value is £18 million and funding has been made available through Scottish Futures Trust (SFT) which delivers public infrastructure investment on behalf of the Scottish Government through the hub network and Glasgow City Council.

Carntyne Primary School

Carntyne Primary School

Bruce Dickson, regional director at BAM Construction, said: “We are delighted to have been selected for this contract. The partnership between our local authorities, hub West and SFT is transforming Scotland’s school estate and creating buildings of importance for the wider community.”

Iain Marley, CEO of hub West Scotland, added: “We are proud to be delivering these schools on behalf of our Partner, Glasgow City Council and we are very pleased to continue our successful partnership with BAM. The projects will create high quality inspiring learning environments and bring significant benefits to local communities starting immediately during the construction period and continuing well beyond.”

BAM Construction has completed a number of primary and secondary schools in both East and West Scotland including the £27m Barrhead Secondary School for East Renfrewshire Council which was recently handed-over and Our Lady and St Patricks for West Dunbartonshire Council valued at £25m which opened to pupils in August this year.

Both of these projects were delivered in partnership with hub West Scotland.

Dunfermline Carnegie Library & Galleries named Scotland’s best building

The Carnegie Library and Galleries in Dunfermline

The Carnegie Library and Galleries in Dunfermline

The Dunfermline Carnegie Library & Galleries scooped the UK’s richest architecture prize last night as it was awarded the RIAS Andrew Doolan Best Building in Scotland Award for 2017.

Designed by Richard Murphy Architects and built by BAM Construction, the project was selected by judges as “a clear winner” from a shortlist of twelve winners of RIAS Awards for 2017, which were presented in June.

The winner of this year’s RIAS Andrew Doolan Best Building in Scotland Award receives a gold medal cast by internationally renowned Scottish goldsmith James Brent Ward and a cheque for £25,000. This makes it the richest architectural prize in the UK and one of the most significant architecture awards in Europe. The award is generously supported by the late Andrew Doolan’s family and by the Scottish Government.

The judges for this year’s award were RIAS President, Stewart Henderson PRIAS, Professor Sue Roaf FRIAS, recently retired Professor of Architectural Engineering at Heriot-Watt University and Susie Stirling, head of placemaking & housing in the Scottish Government’s Planning & Architecture Department.

DunfermlineCarnegieLibrary&Galleries1The full judges’ citation for the winning project reads: “In 2007 Richard Murphy Architects won a competition for a major new cultural hub in Dunfermline’s historic centre. The new building is organised along a top-lit internal street, criss-crossed by bridges. To provide access an adjacent car park was redesigned as a walled garden leading to an entrance courtyard. External materials are sandstone, oak and Corten steel, acknowledging the town’s industrial heritage and the steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, after whom the building is named.

“Internally the new spaces connect with the existing library, reference rooms repurposed as events spaces. At the lower level the local history reading room is organised in three tiers.  The children’s library, opens directly onto the garden.  On the floor above the café’s terraces offers views over the Abbey.  Above is a double level, barrel vaulted museum and three flexible art galleries. The circulation ‘architectural promenade’ offers key views of significant historic buildings, culminating in a cube window framing views of the Abbey.”

Dunfermline Carnegie Library & Galleries_Richard Murphy Architects_M LambieThe award was presented at a ceremony at the National Museum of Scotland (Doolan Award winner for 2011) by the cabinet secretary for culture, tourism and external affairs, Ms Fiona Hyslop MSP alongside Mrs Margaret Doolan Hon FRIAS (the late Andrew Doolan’s mother).

Fiona Hyslop said: “Last year the RIAS-led national Festival of Architecture focussed international attention on Scottish architecture and the quality of the shortlist for this year’s RIAS Andrew Doolan Award illustrates again the continuing excellence of new architecture in Scotland.

“I am always delighted to announce the winner of the RIAS Andrew Doolan Best Building in Scotland Award and, in this Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology, the quality of the winner and of all the shortlisted projects illustrate that we are building a future heritage in Scotland that we can truly be proud of.”

The shortlist for the RIAS Andrew Doolan Best Building in Scotland Award comprised this year’s RIAS Awards winners, as follows:

  1. City of Glasgow College – City Campus    

Reiach and Hall Architects / Michael Laird Architects for City of Glasgow College

  1. Due West, Craobh Haven

cameronwebster architects for Gordon and Margaret Turner

  1. Dunfermline Carnegie Library & Galleries

Richard Murphy Architects for Fife Council

  1. Eastwood Health and Care Centre, Glasgow       

Hoskins Architects for hub West Scotland on behalf of NHS Greater Glasgow &    Clyde with East Renfrewshire Council

  1. Edinburgh Road, Musselburgh

A449 LTD for Archie and Tricia MacDonald

  1. Fernaig Cottage, Stromeferry

Scampton and Barnett Architects for Andrew and Gillian Barnett

  1. Glendale Primary School, Glasgow          

Glasgow City Council – DRS Project Management & Design for Glasgow City Council

  1. James Gillespie’s Campus, Edinburgh     

jmarchitects for The City of Edinburgh Council

  1. Moray Place, Edinburgh     

Somner Macdonald Architects (for a private client)

  1. Newhouse of Auchengree, North Ayrshire          

Ann Nisbet Studio for Dr Michael Law and Sally Law

  1. Powis Place, Aberdeen       

Carson & Partners for Alumno Development

  1. Rockvilla – National Theatre of Scotland HQ, Glasgow

Hoskins Architects for National Theatre of Scotland

BAM reveals senior UK construction management changes

James Wimpenny

James Wimpenny

James Wimpenny is to take over the reins at BAM Construct UK from chief executive Graham Cash who is retiring at the end of the year after more than 31 years at the company.

Currently joint managing director of the UK construction business with Douglas Keillor, Wimpenny has particular responsibility for overseeing the North East, North West, Midlands and London divisions.

Graham Cash

Graham Cash

Having joined BAM in 1985, he served as regional director of the North East division of BAM Construction from 2006 to 2015 when he was appointed an executive director of BAM Construct UK.

He will move into his new position from January 1, from which point the board of BAM Construct UK Ltd will comprise of James Wimpenny, chief executive; Douglas Keillor, executive director; Neil McGruer, finance director; and Andrea Singh, director of human resources.

V&A Dundee architect sees cliff-inspired vision revealed for first time

VA Kengo visitThe architect of V&A Museum of Design Dundee said he is “delighted and satisfied” as he saw his vision inspired by Scotland’s cliffs revealed for the first time.

Kengo Kuma visited the £80.1 million project shortly after the removal of a temporary cofferdam which allowed the museum to be built into the water.

The resulting realisation of the façade is a dramatic river-facing front of the museum which juts outs into the River Tay.

For Kengo Kuma, the Japanese architect who also designed the Tokyo 2020 Olympic stadium, this aspect of the building coupled with the reflecting ponds which surround and flow between the two blocks, completes a “continuous waterscape” and brings a sense of nature to the development.

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

Mr Kuma said: “My inspiration always starts from the place where the project will be. In the past I visited Scotland many times, this very beautiful country, and I’m truly in love with the Scottish landscape and nature.

“I really hope once finished this project will attract many people from the UK, and around the world, to the city and the museum. I hope as well that people from Dundee will use it as an everyday part of their city; that they will go there to enjoy the building with its surrounding public space and find a harmonious relationship between the museum, the riverside, the city and themselves.

“I am delighted and satisfied with what we’ve achieved so far. The realisation of the strong façade is great. We were able to express the dynamic scale of the interior, too – just as we had planned.”

The removal of the cofferdam involved digging out 12,500 tonnes of stone and cutting out a structure of vertical metal sheets which was constructed on the bedrock of the river.

The exterior walls are also complete, with all 2,500 cast stone panels now hung on V&A Dundee’s complex walls, which curve both vertically and horizontally.

These panels were made in moulds, weigh up to two tonnes each and span up to four metres. The size, shape and placement of the panels varies around the building, creating changing patterns of shadows as the sun moves around the museum.

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

No detail has been considered too small. Each of the windows are positioned to give visitors specific outward views towards the River Tay and its two bridges. Even the smaller windows are placed to provide a shimmering effect as the sunlight bounces off the intricate angles.

V&A Dundee director, Philip Long, said the relationship between Dundee and the River Tay has been re-established and reinvigorated by Kengo Kuma’s designs.

Asked about his most pleasing element to the build so far, Mr Long reflected on a boat trip he took when the coffer dam was first removed to see the building finally emerge from the land and connect with the water.

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

He told Scottish Construction Now: “We took the sensible decision early based on cost and risk to bring the building closer to the land and a fantastic public space has been created as a result.

“It has been a pleasure working alongside Kengo Kuma Associates and to see the team respond to challenges in creative ways.”

Mr Long added: “It is a real pleasure to have the architect of V&A Dundee, Kengo Kuma, with us today to see the incredible progress that has been made in bringing his vision to life. Everyone working on the design and construction should be incredibly proud of what they’ve achieved.”

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

Image by Ross Fraser McLean

For Malcolm Boyd, construction manager at BAM Construct UK, the jewel in the crown is ‘Wall 14’, a sloping curved structure on the northern block reminiscent of a wave which Boyd describes as “absolutely fantastic”.

He added the elements of the inside of the museum, which will remain under wraps to all but a select few until the official opening, are “simply breathtaking”.

John Campbell, commercial manager at BAM Construct UK, told Scottish Construction Now of his satisfaction of seeing the whole project team pulling in the same direction.

He added: “Seeing the complicated parts all coming together so well has been great. The whole team has been working together with the same goal of creating something special. Its been a tremendous effort by everyone.”

Construction of the building will be completed by the end of December with the museum scheduled to open next summer.

Perth City Hall and Perth Museum and Art Gallery designers selected

Perth City Hall Mecanoo 3

Mecanoo’s plans for Perth City Hall

The designers for the revamped Perth City Hall and Perth Museum and Art Gallery have been unveiled following a competitive process.

Metaphor has been appointed as the “interpretation and exhibition designers” for the city centre venues and will work with Mecanoo and Hoskins Architects, the architects of the respective projects, to develop new interiors and exhibition spaces in both buildings and bring the stories of Perth’s Ancient Roots and its Modern Scots to life.

London-based design practice Metaphor has a track record of major cultural projects in the UK and beyond which include Shakespeare’s Globe, the Ashmolean Museum, major galleries in the V&A London and in the National Museums and Galleries of Scotland. It is currently developing the exhibitions for the proposed St Kilda visitor centre to be located on Lewis.

Councillor Ian Campbell, leader of Perth & Kinross Council, said: “The council’s plans to make culture accessible to everyone have taken another step forward with the appointment of Metaphor. Interpreting and explaining art and artefacts is a key part of a successful cultural venue and will ensure the Museum and City Hall are the top-class attractions that Perth and Kinross deserves.”

Helen Smout, chief executive of Culture Perth and Kinross, added: “The museum collections of Perth and Kinross are of National Significance and we will be bringing the stories they tell to life at City Hall and Perth Museum – for local people and visitors from across the UK and the world.”

Dutch practice Mecanoo was appointed to transform Perth City Hall into a £20 million major arts hub in August.

BAM Construction will work with hub East Central Scotland to redevelop the Edwarian building, with construction expected to start work in 2019 and the grand opening scheduled for 2021.

The contractor will also lead the £10m Hoskins Architects-designed revamp of Perth Museum and Art Gallery with Ogilvie Construction tasked with building the new collection store on a separate site.

BAM Properties and Hermes to deliver prime Edinburgh office development

CapitalSquare-Exterior-Final-23March16The largest speculative office development currently underway in Edinburgh is set to be delivered by BAM Properties after the contractor struck a deal with Hermes Investment Management.

Upon completion, Capital Square will be a premier 122,000 sq ft, eight-floor purpose-built office development designed to a high specification and featuring an underground car park. Centrally located in the city’s Exchange business district, between Morrison Street and Lothian Road, the scheme is in close proximity to Haymarket Station and other transport links, as well as a large variety of local amenities.

BAM Construction has been appointed to build this prime development, which will accommodate up to 1,400 people, with work due to commence on site this month and the development expected to be ready for occupancy in early 2020.

Hermes Investment Management, in association with Parlison Properties Ltd, secured planning approval for the development in 2015 and Parlison Properties will continue as development consultant to the project.

Designed by architects Hurd Rolland, the building will feature a glazed curtain-walling facade, double-height reception with a statement atrium, and a courtyard entrance, set within a private south-facing landscaped garden. The property will also boast rooftop terraces offering unrivalled views.

In keeping with its Grade A status, Capital Square will comply with the highest environmental standards, including a BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) ‘Excellent’ rating on completion and an EPC ‘A’ rating. Additional features will include solar panels, LED lighting and a 24-hour staffed security system, as well as facilities for cyclists and runners.

Dougie Peters, managing director, BAM Properties, said: “BAM has a successful track record of identifying when the market is right for investment. We believe now is the time. We are confident in the Edinburgh office market and the Edinburgh economy generally. The city continues to suffer from a lack of Grade A supply with strong demand from occupiers for new space. We have a great partner and project team in place providing us with all the right ingredients to undertake a speculative development of this quality.

“This development is special for many reasons, not least its location and staff friendly features. It will provide a competitive edge as Edinburgh lacks high-calibre developments of this scale capable of attracting blue-chip occupiers.”

Chris Taylor, head of private markets at Hermes Investment Management, added: “Strategically located in the heart of Edinburgh’s premier business district, this Grade A development features the highest quality facilities and will create a prime working environment, whilst also complying with the highest environmental standards. As our fellow landowner and our partner, we would not be at this stage in the development’s evolution without the assistance of the City of Edinburgh Council.

“The largest speculative office development at present in Edinburgh, Capital Square offers an attractive proposition as it meets ongoing strong occupier demand for high quality, central office space close to key transport connections and amenities. We look forward to working with our partners to deliver this exceptional scheme.”

Montagu Evans and CBRE have been appointed as joint letting agents.

New research to determine how bacteria can solidify soil without the use of concrete

Professor Lunn

Professor Lunn

Professor Rebecca Lunn MBE of the University of Strathclyde has extended her well-established partnership with BAM Nuttall by taking up the five-year post of BAM Nuttall / RAEng Research Chair in Biomineral Technologies for Ground Engineering.

Professor Lunn will examine and scale up microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), researching how bacteria can solidify soil, reducing the use of cement in construction and unlocking low-carbon alternatives for the industry.

The MICP process uses naturally-occurring bacteria and urea solutions injected into soil to changes its properties, making the soil stronger and more stable. The bacteria precipitate calcite, a hard mineral that binds together particles in the soil, turning loose soil into an instant rock. This technology can be used to build and repair infrastructure, minimising carbon-intensive use of cement.

Professor Lunn said: “We want to develop sustainable earth infrastructure that harness the biomineral technology to improve the properties of the existing soil; providing a durable, non-destructive alternative to traditional carbon-intensive construction methods.

“Having collaborated with BAM Nuttall over a number of years, we share a common understanding of how to turn early-stage research into innovative construction techniques. BAM’s knowledge and experience in the infrastructure sector will allow this technology to gain early acceptance and broaden the range of applications quickly.”

Globally, a few small-scale field trails and industrial applications of the technique have been completed, however none have been conducted in the UK to-date.

“We’re absolutely delighted that Professor Lunn will be taking up the BAM Nuttall / RAEng Research Chair,” added BAM Nuttall director, Alasdair Henderson. “Construction has a mixed record in research and development, something that BAM has worked hard to change over recent years. We know that successfully implementing innovations like MICP leads directly to improved productivity, lower carbon demand and greater economic growth, with a beneficial effect across society.”

The research will build on Professor Lunn’s previous work applying MICP to seal rock fractures during the construction of geological disposal facilities for nuclear waste. Her group has successfully developed the technology for sealing individual fractures within the laboratory at the 1-2 metre scale. In partnership with BAM Nuttall, the Research Chair position will allow progression from these laboratory tests to field trials for rock fracture sealing.