Glasgow City Region City Deal

Ravenscraig regeneration given £190m roads programme boost

The Pan-Lanarkshire Orbital transport corridor and Motherwell Interchange

The Pan-Lanarkshire Orbital transport corridor and Motherwell Interchange

The strategic business case for a £190 million roads programme in North Lanarkshire has been approved by the Glasgow City Region City Deal cabinet.

Representing the biggest single roads and infrastructure investment in the region’s history, the Pan-Lanarkshire Orbital project will effectively join the M74 in the south with the M80 in the north, in a move expected to increase private sector investment in Ravenscraig and across North Lanarkshire.

The business case projects that the programme has the ability to create 6,700 jobs and boost the economy by £360m.

It will provide new and upgraded roads from the M74 at Motherwell, through the strategic investment site at Ravenscraig to the M8 at Eurocentral, and onward past Airdrie on a new link road to the A73 south of Cumbernauld.

The project will also see an improved public transport hub at Motherwell train station incorporating access improvements, park and ride expansion, active travel links and new public realm works.

North Lanarkshire Council leader, Councillor Jim Logue, said: “This is a groundbreaking investment which will provide an enormous boost to the North Lanarkshire economy.

“North Lanarkshire is open for business. As part of our strategy, it’s essential that we are able to attract significant investment to Ravenscraig, and improve access to jobs for people across the area. Only by providing excellent roads infrastructure can we attract businesses to invest, and this development ensures great access and a link between the M74 in the south and the M80 in the north.”

Around £94m of the investment will come from the Glasgow City Region City Deal, with the balance to be funded through council capital funding and developer contributions.

Councillor Logue added: “The strategic case approved by the Glasgow City Region cabinet demonstrates the need for improved connectivity between the population and existing and planned employment. The project breaks down barriers to economic growth and unlocks development opportunities throughout North Lanarkshire.”

The £1.13 billion Glasgow City Region City Deal is an agreement between the UK government, Scottish Government and eight local authorities across the Glasgow City Region to deliver improved infrastructure, create new jobs, tackle unemployment and drive innovation and growth.

Detailed planning work will now start, with construction expected to begin in 2019.

Location announced for £65m manufacturing centre of excellence

Welding Iron Worker Industry Steel Welder manufacturing stockRenfrewshire will be home to the new £65 million National Manufacturing Institute for Scotland (NMIS) with the University of Strathclyde named as the anchor university, it was revealed today.

Work to build the centre, which will help manufacturing businesses throughout Scotland become world leaders in innovation, will begin next year.  The centre at Inchinnan will be located right next to Glasgow International Airport and the M8.

The Scottish Government will invest £48m in NMIS with £8m from the University of Strathclyde. This is in addition to the £8.9m announced in June 2017 for the Lightweight Manufacturing Centre as a first step towards the wider centreRenfrewshire Council will provide a further £39.1m through the Glasgow City Region Deal to support wider infrastructure work at the site.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and economy secretary Keith Brown made the announcement during a visit to Rolls-Royce’s manufacturing facility in Inchinnan. Rolls-Royce is a founding member of the University of Strathclyde’s existing Advanced Forming Research Centre.

Speaking after a meeting with some of Scotland’s leading manufacturing companies, the First Minister said: “This exciting facility will be an industry-led international centre of manufacturing expertise. Research, industry and the public sector will work together to transform skills, productivity and innovation, attracting investment and making Scotland a global leader in advanced manufacturing.

“It will help companies right across Scotland embrace new manufacturing techniques, support cutting edge research and help to further develop the skills of our workforce. The manufacturing jobs of the future offer exciting and rewarding careers for young people. We want to inspire them to work in this sector and revive Scotland’s proud tradition of manufacturing and engineering.

“Inchinnan provides a gateway to the world through proximity to the airport and revives Scotland’s proud tradition of manufacturing and engineering.

“Although the centre will sit on the Clydeside, the benefits will be felt throughout Scotland.”

Unlocking economic potential in manufacturing and innovation is expected to play a key role in this week’s Scottish Budget, alongside digital connectivity, infrastructure and housing.

Economy secretary Keith Brown added: “Manufacturing is a key industry, already accounting for 52% of Scotland’s international exports, and nearly £600m of Scotland’s spend on business research and development.

“Our investment in NMIS builds on our support for the Lightweight Manufacturing Centre and will support that and our ambitious target of doubling business expenditure on research and development by 2025. This centre will not only see us continue to reach out worldwide, but also see the rest of the world turning to Scotland for innovation and expertise.”

Professor Sir Jim McDonald, principal and vice-chancellor of the University of Strathclyde, said: “Today’s announcement marks the beginning of a new chapter for Scottish manufacturing, building on a great tradition of innovation. By capitalising on world-class, industry-relevant research and supporting skills-development, the new institute will attract inward investment to Scotland, stimulate the creation of jobs and help companies compete globally.

“The University of Strathclyde prides itself on forging new levels of collaboration between researchers and the public and private sectors to accelerate the pace of research and development, and crucially, to deliver benefit to businesses and the economy. We are delighted to be the anchor university for the Institute and will ensure close engagement with the Scottish Research Partnership in Engineering representing a consortium of Scotland’s leading research intensive universities. We also look forward to working closely with new and existing partners to deliver a step-change in advanced manufacturing for Scotland.”

Renfrewshire Council leader Iain Nicolson added: “Renfrewshire has long been renowned for its manufacturing expertise and innovation, not least in giving Paisley Pattern to the world, and I am excited about the prospect of helping to play our part in making Scotland a global leader in advanced manufacturing.

“I believe through our existing manufacturing expertise combined with excellent transport connections by air, land and sea – which will be further enhanced by our Glasgow City Region City Deal projects – Renfrewshire offers the perfect environment for the National Manufacturing Institute for Scotland to flourish and we look forward to working with colleagues to deliver its ambitious aims.”

Managing director at Scottish Enterprise, Linda Hanna, said: “Supporting growth in Scotland’s manufacturing sector is a key priority for us and central to the future of Scotland’s economy. Today’s announcement marks a great milestone in the journey towards creating expertise and capability in a new hub to help drive increased innovation and investment. We are looking forward to continuing to work closely with partners to deliver this ambitious project and grow Scotland’s reputation as a global hub for high value manufacturing.”

Early New Year start for £7.2m Sauchiehall Street revamp

Sauchiehall Street2Work to deliver a £7.2 million facelift for Glasgow’s Sauchiehall Street will begin on 8 January 2018.

The project will take place along Sauchiehall Street between Charing Cross and Rose Street.

The Sauchiehall Street Avenue project will see the creation of a multifunctional service verge and two-way cycle lane on the northern side of the street. The pavements will be widened to free up space for pedestrians and licensed tables and chairs on both sides of Sauchiehall Street.

In addition, 28 trees – in a variety of deciduous species, with attractive colours throughout the year – will be planted along the Avenue, along with new bus shelters, cycle stands, seating, smart city infrastructure and improved street lighting.

The project – expected to be complete by summer 2019 – also involves the four streets to the south of Sauchiehall Street between Elmbank Street and Douglas Street.  The Sauchiehall Street Avenue will be the first of sixteen such avenues to be created on Glasgow city centre streets in the coming years.

Sauchiehall Street3The Sauchiehall Street Avenue project is funded by the Glasgow City Region City Deal, and is part of the £115m Enabling Infrastructure Integrated Public Realm programme, known as the Avenues, for Glasgow’s city centre.

Councillor Susan Aitken, leader of Glasgow City Council and chair of the Glasgow City Region City Deal Cabinet, said: “The Sauchiehall Street Avenue project will play a key role in the regeneration of one of Glasgow’s most famous streets, one which for generations has been a leading destination for shoppers, workers, students, theatre and concert-goers as well as people visiting bars and restaurants.

“This project will make the Charing Cross – Rose Street stretch of Sauchiehall Street an even more attractive location and a welcoming gateway to the city centre.  The work on the Avenue will improve connections for everyone, especially pedestrians and cyclists, and this greater connectivity will bring economic, environmental and social benefits to all those individuals and organisations who use the area.

“This is the first example of our new approach to realising the full potential of the city centre and in doing so, create economic growth for all of Glasgow’s people.”

Keepmoat named preferred housing developer for next phase of £250m Sighthill regeneration

Sighthill new 2Glasgow City Council has announced the appointment of Keepmoat Homes as its preferred developer for the provision of more than 800 new homes through the residential development at the Sighthill Transformational Regeneration Area (TRA) in the city.

The residential development will feature 826 new homes (628 for sale, 198 for mid-market rent), as well as retail units and a commercial development over the next decade to complete the regeneration of Sighthill.

The new mid-market rent homes will be built by Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) and let and managed by GHA’s partners in Wheatley Group, Lowther Homes, with the private homes, retail unit and commercial development being delivered through a development agreement between Keepmoat Homes and Glasgow City Council.

Sighthill 2When complete, the regeneration of Sighthill, the biggest such project in the UK outside of London, will deliver almost 1000 (141 new GHA homes are already built and occupied) new high-quality homes for sale and rent; a new community school campus; a new footbridge across the M8, creating a ‘street in the sky’ to connect Sighthill to the neighbouring city centre; a new road bridge across the railway to link Sighthill and Port Dundas; as well as improved parkland throughout the entire area, active travel routes to and from the city centre, allotments and public spaces.

Keepmoat Homes became the preferred developer after a competitive dialogue process, with two excellent final bids submitted in August before the final decision in late September.

Councillor Kenny McLean, city convener for neighbourhoods, housing and public realm, said: “This is a historic day for Sighthill and Glasgow. The appointment of Keepmoat Homes as our preferred developer to deliver new homes, shops and a commercial development in Sighthill marks the next step for the regeneration of Sighthill. This area, immediately to the north of the city centre, has fantastic potential, and I am sure it will become an example of regeneration to follow in the years to come. I would like to thank all those organisations involved in the process, and I am delighted with the quality of the proposals put in front of us. This quality gives me great confidence in the future success of this project.”

Sighthill newTom Barclay, Wheatley Group director of property and development, said: “The new mid-market development helps us increase the supply of much-needed affordable homes in the city and will be a key part in the transformation of the area. It’s an exciting time for Sighthill and we’ll be working closely with the local community and our partners at the city council and the Scottish Government as the plans progress.”

Sighthill and Glasgow will also gain from this regeneration project through a community benefits programme from Keepmoat Homes that will deliver 62 new jobs through modern apprenticeships, graduates and new entrants; 45 new jobs on the construction project; support for 46 existing apprenticeships; and 82 work placements.

This community benefits programme will also involve education and training support; a commitment to a minimum value in sub-contracts to SMEs and social enterprises; events to support the supply chain; the support of 10 disadvantaged groups over a seven-year period; and a commitment to spending at least £20,000 on local engagement through community initiatives, digital inclusion and a local development trust.

Sighthill new 3At present, the most visible sign of Sighthill’s regeneration are the 141 modern, spacious, energy-efficient homes built by GHA in 2015, and the demolition of the high-rise blocks across the site.

Other key dates to note regarding key elements of the project include the imminent completion of remediation work; the delivery of infrastructure works – including new utilities, public realm and the public park – by late 2019; the building of a new community campus school by October 2019; the construction of a new road bridge across the Glasgow-Edinburgh railway line, to be complete by late 2018; and the delivery of the M8 pedestrian bridge by late 2019.

The regeneration of Sighthill is being delivered by Transforming Communities: Glasgow, a partnership between Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Housing Association and the Scottish Government, with additional funding from the Glasgow City Region City Deal.

Ministers to call in £90m Clyde Waterfront and Renfrew Riverside project

An artist's impression of what the revamped Clyde Waterfront would look like

An artist’s impression of what the revamped Clyde Waterfront would look like

A £90 million proposal to regenerate the Clyde Waterfront is to be called in by the Scottish Government at the request of three local authorities to “streamline” the planning process.

The Clyde Waterfront and Renfrew Riverside project aims to regenerate the waterfront as an area supporting residential, industrial, business, retail and leisure opportunities.

Led by Renfrewshire Council as part of the £1.13 billion Glasgow City Region City Deal, the project includes construction of the only opening road bridge across the River Clyde and new roads and cycle routes to better link the communities of Renfrew with Yoker and Clydebank.

ClydeBridge_1200px_01

‘Twin leaf’ designs for the bridge were unveiled by Falkirk Wheel architect Tony Kettle in July

Given the scale of the project, Renfrewshire Council has reached an agreement with West Dunbartonshire and Glasgow City Councils to request that the Scottish Government calls in the planning decision to streamline the process.

The Scottish Government has agreed to the request.

Renfrewshire Council leader, Iain Nicolson, said: “It’s right that the Scottish Government determine the planning application for the Glasgow City Region City Deal Clyde Waterfront and Renfrew Riverside project following a request made by Renfrewshire Council in agreement with Glasgow and West Dunbartonshire.

“This is a unique infrastructure project which straddles across three local authorities and it helps simplify the process. The project has the potential for significant economic regeneration across the city region with increased potential for jobs and improved connections to opportunities for local communities and as such, this method of determination is the most effective approach.”

Clyde waterfront regenration 2

The Clyde Waterfront and Renfrew Riverside will include:

  • A 184 metre, two-lane opening bridge across the River Clyde, linking Meadowside Street in Renfrew with Dock Street in Yoker and accommodating vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists.
  • A 750 metre Renfrew North Development Road to link Meadowside Street to the A8 at Argyll Avenue in Renfrew.
  • New cycle lanes and connections to existing cycleways and active travel paths, connecting from Inchinnan Road, Renfrew through to Yoker Railway Station.
  • New bridge approach roads providing access to the River Clyde crossing from existing roads
  • Active travel routes of pedestrian walkways and cycle lanes incorporated into all new roads and bridges

Clyde waterfront regenration 3The Reporter appointed by the Scottish Government will outline the determination timetable and process to determine the planning applications.

If approved, work is expected to start on site in 2018 with construction completed in 2020.

Clyde regeneration backed with £50m quay walls investment

Clyde quay wallsGlasgow City Council has today given the green light to the next stage of investment into the regeneration of the river Clyde with the approval of a quay walls strategy for the river.

Almost £50 million of funding from the Glasgow City Region City Deal is to focus on a stretch of the Clyde between Albert Bridge at Glasgow Green and the proposed Govan-Partick bridge.

The funding will address the structural integrity of quay walls; enhance pedestrian and cycle connectivity along the banks of the river; unlock the development potential of vacant and derelict land along the river corridor; and improve place quality and the vibrancy of the river and its banks.

The council said the strategy will build on its success in attracting development on the banks of the river, including the International Financial Services District, Glasgow Harbour, the Riverside Museum, Pacific Quay and the SEC.

Councillor Kenny McLean, city convener for neighbourhoods, housing and public realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “The full regeneration of the Clyde is key to Glasgow’s future economic success, and today’s decision marks another step towards achieving this goal. The banks of the Clyde offer a fantastic location for people to live, work and visit, as well as a resource that can be used to make the communities of Glasgow better connected.”

Glasgow’s City Development Plan gives recognition to the importance of the Clyde and its potential for regeneration by classifying the river corridor as a Strategic Development Framework (SDF) area within the city.

This classification will be supported by infrastructure funding of £113.9m from the Glasgow City Region City Deal through the Waterfront and West End Innovation Quarter project.  This investment will further develop the banks of the river as an urban quarter that attracts investment and supports economic growth.

This City Deal funding of almost £50mn has been allocated to a quay walls strategy that will improve the access, quality and structural integrity of the waterfront. The lack of investment in the river’s quay walls is seen as a significant barrier to the Clyde’s regeneration, and tackling this issue will reduce the associated costs that often restricts the development of vacant sites adjoining quay walls on the Clyde.

Glasgow City Council owns approximately 3,400 metres of quay wall in the project area, and this investment will deliver a comprehensive upgrade.

Plans submitted for Clyde waterfront and Glasgow Airport regeneration projects

An artist's impression of what the revamped Clyde Waterfront would look like

An artist’s impression of what the revamped Clyde Waterfront would look like

Plans for two new bridges are to form the centrepiece of infrastructure projects to regenerate part of the Clyde waterfront and improve the area around Glasgow Airport.

A planning application has been submitted to authorities in Renfrewshire, Glasgow and West Dunbartonshire for the £90.7 million Clyde Waterfront and Renfrew Riverside project, which aims to regenerate the Clyde Waterfront as an area supporting residential, industrial, business, retail and leisure opportunities.

The project, led by Renfrewshire Council as part of the £1.13 billion Glasgow City Region City Deal, includes construction of the only opening road bridge across the River Clyde and new roads and cycle routes to better link the communities of Renfrew with Yoker and Clydebank.

Clyde waterfront regenration 2Plans for the £39.1m Glasgow Airport Investment Area project are also being submitted to Renfrewshire planning officials.

Construction of a new bridge over the White Cart, realignment of Abbotsinch Road, and new cycle routes form the project proposals to improve connections between the existing Westway, Inchinnan and Airport business parks.

It will also facilitate the creation of a world class business and commercial location in the heart of Renfrewshire, connected by air, sea and land.


Clyde waterfront regenration 3The Clyde Waterfront and Renfrew Riverside will include:

  • A 184 metre, two-lane opening bridge across the River Clyde, linking Meadowside Street in Renfrew with Dock Street in Yoker and accommodating vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists.
  • A 750 metre Renfrew North Development Road to link Meadowside Street to the A8 at Argyll Avenue in Renfrew.
  • New cycle lanes and connections to existing cycleways and active travel paths, connecting from Inchinnan Road, Renfrew through to Yoker Railway Station.
  • New bridge approach roads providing access to the River Clyde crossing from existing roads
  • Active travel routes of pedestrian walkways and cycle lanes incorporated into all new roads and bridges

Renfrewshire Council said this will attract £282m in private sector investment, deliver 1690 new homes and bring back 83 hectares of land into use.

It will also create 1015 jobs during the construction period and 629 permanent jobs as a result of new business creation.


Bob Grant, chief executive of Renfrewshire Chamber of Commerce, said the City Deal projects would bring jobs and business benefits to the local area.

He said: “These projects offer tremendous benefits for local businesses and have the potential to transform how we do business in Renfrewshire.

“These major infrastructure investments will make it easier for employers to do business, easier for employees to get to and from their places of work and open up the potential for future investment.

“Around 1,400 jobs are expected during the construction period and a further 11,000 permanent jobs could be created through existing business expansion and new businesses being attracted to the area as a result of the City Deal infrastructure investment.”


Clyde waterfront regenration 4The Glasgow Airport Investment Area will include:

  • Realignment and upgrading of Abbotsinch Road – including 1620 metres of new road – to establish a high quality gateway into the new investment area
  • A new 70 metre, two-lane bridge over the White Cart river from Wright Street to an approach road off Arran Avenue
  • Active travel routes of pedestrian walkways and cycle lanes incorporated into all new roads and bridges
  • A 2030 metre off-road cycleway connecting the realigned Abbotsinch Road to Inchinnan Business Park
  • A 100 metre cycleway and pedestrian bridge spanning the Black Cart

It is hoped the project will support the continued expansion of Glasgow Airport and bring £430m in private sector investment.

Renfrewshire Council also said the scheme will create 365 jobs during construction and up to 10,600 jobs as a result of new business creation in the Investment Area.


Mr Grant added: “Improved connections will also benefit the public and local employers, with 59,000 jobs becoming more accessible to Renfrewshire residents.

“I am very excited at the potential of the Glasgow Airport Investment Area to bring highly-skilled jobs to the area. The signs are already there – the first minister recently announced that an £8.9m specialist centre to develop new manufacturing processes for lightweight materials for the aerospace and automotive industries will be established here in Renfrewshire.

“It has been encouraging to see the public are firmly behind these projects and I look forward to seeing the work get under way. These are key projects in the Glasgow City Region City Deal, which has the potential to unlock £3.3bn in private sector investment benefitting the whole region.”

If approved, work on both projects is expected to start on site in 2018 with construction completed in 2020.

Further funding approved for Sauchiehall Street revamp

Sauchiehall StreetPlans to transform Sauchiehall Street into a tree-lined avenue have been boosted by almost £7 million in funding from Glasgow City Council.

The revamp will introduce a two-way cycle lane and improve pavements for people walking along the bars and clubs.

Pay and display parking would also be completely removed and more trees planted along the road to create what has been dubbed “Sauchiehall Street Avenue” in council documentation.

Sauchiehall Street3A committee meeting at the local authority yesterday passed the funding of £6.751m for the plan, which has been in place since 2015.

The work marks the start of a £115m investment by the council to create a network of continuous pedestrian and cycle priority routes in the city centre.

Sauchiehall Street2Glasgow City Council leader and Glasgow City Region City Deal Cabinet chairwoman, Susan Aitken, welcomed the vital decision to approve the funding.

She said: “This approval of the full business case for the Sauchiehall Street project is great news for the city, and will transform this vital part of the city centre.

“This scheme will be the first visible example of what this City Deal will do for Glasgow and will leave the Sauchiehall Street area better-connected, with improved cycling and pedestrian infrastructure and offering more and improved sites making this an even more attractive location for businesses to invest in.”

Business case approved for £28m Exxon site revamp

Aerial view of Bowling and the River Clyde

Aerial view of Bowling and the River Clyde

Plans for a £28 million transformation of the former Exxon site in Bowling, West Dunbartonshire have taken a major step forward after councillors approved an Outline Business Case.

The project includes a proposal to create a major industrial and commercial development at the site, as well as plans for a new road to provide an alternative route in and out of West Dunbartonshire.

The proposed development is part of the Glasgow City Region City Deal and would see West Dunbartonshire Council contribute £3.8m towards the overall £28m cost, with the rest being funded by the UK and Scottish Governments.

It is expected that the project would support up to 690 full-time jobs and generate around £19.1m each year for the West of Scotland economy.

Following the approval of the Outline Business Case by the council this week, it will now go before the City Deal Cabinet in April.

If the City Deal Cabinet approve the Outline Business Case, the next steps will be to develop dialogue with other affected land owners and to launch detailed consultations with the local community. A Final Business Case will then be prepared, in which detailed site design and analysis will be included. Following that, negotiations with Exxon over the transfer of the site would be concluded before the Final Business Case is put before council for approval.

If the Final Business Case is approved, it is expected that infrastructure work would begin on the site in early 2021 and be completed in 2024.

Councillor Patrick McGlinchey, convener for infrastructure and regeneration, said: “This project would stand as one of the biggest ever infrastructure improvements in West Dunbartonshire and would bring about real change for the area, not least with the much-needed alternative road route in and out of the area. I am pleased that the Council has approved the Outline Business Case and we look forward to continuing progress on this ambitious project.”

Councillor David McBride, vice-convener for infrastructure and regeneration, added: “This decision taken by the Council marks a significant step forward in the City Deal project for West Dunbartonshire. While there is still much work to be done in detailing how exactly the site would look, it is clear that there is an appetite among businesses to come to the area. You only need to look at the Lomondgate site to see evidence of that. The former Exxon site is in a prime location for commercial use and the jobs and income it would bring would be a huge benefit to our area.”

Council awards design contract for Govan-Partick bridge

Govan Partick bridgeGlasgow City Council has appointed global engineering consultancy CH2M Hill to undertake design of a new bridge between Govan and Partick.

To be funded through the £1.13 billion Glasgow City Region City Deal, the pedestrian / cycle bridge will be renew the historical connection between the two areas and will be able to open to ensure that vessels such as Waverley will still be able to berth up-stream.

CH2M Hill (formerly Halcrow) has previously delivered a number of bridges across the River Clyde, including the Clyde Arc, the Dalmarnock Smart Bridge and the Tradeston Bridge.

The consultancy’s Glasgow office will develop the design of the bridge, with construction work expected to begin in 2019.

Support for a bridge between Govan and Partick was one of the most popular themes of a three-day charrette (workshop) involving members of the community from both areas that looked to establish a shared vision of the future. Most of those taking part felt that the bridge should cross from Water Row in Govan to either the Glasgow Harbour East site or a location beside the Riverside Museum, and a feasibility study will examine the most appropriate site for this.

Councillor Frank McAveety, leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “Govan and Partick shared a connection for centuries, and with so much regeneration happening in both communities, the time has come for this bridge to further and strengthen their development.  I am delighted to see the beginning of work on this, the next phase of the regeneration of the Clyde.”

This new connection across the Clyde will stimulate economic growth and improve links between the University of Glasgow campus and the hub of high-tech research facilities located at the new Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH).

It is hoped that the bridge will have a significant positive impact on the regeneration of Govan by re-positioning it at the heart of a triangle of economic opportunity created by the University to the North, the QEUH campus to the west and Pacific Quay to the east.

The new bridge will also strengthen the existing circuit of visitor attractions on either bank of the river.