Restoration work at Campbeltown Picture House underway



Corramore ConstructionA £2.5 million refurbishment of the historic Picture House in Campbeltown has begun following the appointment of a contractor to the project.

Corramore Construction will now begin the process of restoring the art nouveau landmark to include a 192 seat main auditorium, a 53 seat new second auditorium, a new entrance foyer and café, a gallery and education room.

First opening its doors in 1913, the Picture House is the oldest continuously operated cinema in Scotland but has been closed for the past 18 months.

Jane Mayo, chairman of Campbeltown Community Business, said: “It is an exciting moment for all those many people who have been involved in its care, that CCB is finally able to announce the appointment of a contractor to deliver the construction part of the project.

“When the restoration is complete, this cinema will be able to stand tall amongst the great cinema buildings of the world. It is hoped this will add to the impact of other recent developments in the town to bring a new era of prosperity to Kintyre.”

Jonathan Payne, managing director of Corramore Construction, said: “The project will bring the historic cinema up to the standards expected by a modern cinema-going audience, while respecting its architectural and historical significance.”

Architects Burrell Foley Fischer added: “Burrell Foley Fischer look forward to CorraMore joining the team for the construction stage of the Centenary Project for the Picture House in Campbeltown. The project will bring the historic cinema up to the standards expected by a modern cinema going audience, while respecting its architectural and historical significance. It will also provide much needed new foyer, cafe bar, and exhibition facilities and a second screen.

“Through our experience of working with many independent cinemas throughout the UK, we are very aware of the importance of these venues to their local communities and we are delighted to be able to contribute, as architects, to the sustainable future of such an historically important and much loved cinema.”

The money for the restoration came from several different sources including the UK and Scottish governments, the National Lottery and Highlands and Islands Enterprise.

The work is due to finish in March 2017.