Historic Environment Scotland

Research to map effects of climate change on Scotland’s coasts and monuments

St Andrews’ coast will be mapped as part of the project

The damage that climate change could cause to nearly one fifth of Scotland’s coastline as well as important infrastructure and monuments from and the steps that could be taken to mitigate it will be forecast in a new two year research project.

The next phase of DynamicCoast.com will use the latest monitoring techniques to map and categorise the resilience of the Scottish coast and identify the links between erosion and flooding.

The research, led by the Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage and carried out by the University of Glasgow, launches this month and is funded by CREW (Centre for Expertise in Water). It will focus on specific study sites including Montrose Bay, St Andrews and Skara Brae to forecast future change and erosional damage and also work with stakeholders like local authorities, SEPA and Historic Environment Scotland to develop plans to mitigate these effects.

Cabinet secretary for the environment, climate change and land reform, Roseanna Cunningham, said: “Rising sea levels, increased coastal erosion and flooding have caused substantial damage to our coastlines and communities over the last few decades and the pace of erosion is increasing. We need to take action now to adapt and adjust to these changes.

“This research will forecast the extent of damage that could be caused to our precious coastlines through the effects of climate change and will work with communities, local authorities, transport agencies and other planning bodies to develop plans to manage coastal change before it’s too late.”

Scottish Natural Heritage is managing DynamicCoast.com. Chairman Mike Cantlay said: “Scotland’s beaches and dunes play a vital role in protecting £13 billion-worth of buildings and roads. That is more than twice that currently protected by seawalls. By their dynamic nature, shifting sand dunes can replenish areas of shoreline; as such they are our natural defences. This ensures that our beaches and dunes can be a natural ally in combating the effects of climate change.

“And by working with nature at the coast, we can help ease and adapt to climate change impacts – in particular sea level rise and storms.

“We and our partners in Dynamic Coast are committed to forecasting future risks and highlight where we can help nature to help us build resilience to climate change and ensure existing and future development is secure.”

Dynamic Coast’s principal investigator, the University of Glasgow’s Professor Jim Hansom, added: “We are now facing decades of future sea level rise and increasing erosion and flooding at the coast, so we need to better understand the increased risk posed by climate change to coastal assets and communities.

“We need to know whether to adapt, defend or move those coastal assets as well as how social justice might be better incorporated into future policies. Failure to act now will lead to enhanced costs and impacts later.”

Plans approved to create Scotland’s answer to New York’s ‘High Line’

An artist’s impression of the proposed linear park – inspired by New York City’s High Line – that could soon grace the top of the revamped Bowling Harbour bridge at the gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal

An artist’s impression of the proposed linear park – inspired by New York City’s High Line – that could soon grace the top of the revamped Bowling Harbour bridge at the gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal

Ambitious plans to create a new linear park inspired by New York City’s High Line at the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal have taken another step forward with the granting of planning consent for the project.

Scottish Canals and its partners are currently fundraising for the development of the route, which will transform a 120-year-old disused railway bridge at Bowling Harbour in West Dunbartonshire into a fully accessible linear park and pathway. This new route, the latest stage of a £3.2 million project to breathe new life into the area, will form a direct link between the Forth & Clyde Canal towpath and the National Cycle Network route towards Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park.

Helena Huws, design and development manager at Scottish Canals, said: “Over the past few years, we’ve been working with our partners and the local community to breathe new life into Bowling Harbour, investing more than £3.2m in the area. The transformation of the area’s iconic railway bridge into an innovative new parkway overlooking the canal and the River Clyde is the next step in that story and we’re delighted that the project has received planning consent.

“Our recent win at the Scottish Government’s Scottish Awards for Quality in Planning was a fantastic accolade for the masterplan we’ve helped shape with the local community. We look forward to building on that success to bring further investment, employment opportunities and vibrancy to Bowling.”

A 120-year-old swing bridge at Bowling Harbour - the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal - has been lovingly restored as part of the latest stage of a £3.2m transformation of the area

A 120-year-old swing bridge at Bowling Harbour – the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal – has been lovingly restored as part of the latest stage of a £3.2m transformation of the area

The community-led transformation of the area is being undertaken by Scottish Canals in partnership with West Dunbartonshire Council with support from the Coastal Communities Fund, Sustrans Scotland, and Historic Environment Scotland. Over the past three years, the project has refurbished the arches of the area’s decommissioned railway bridge, transforming them into commercial units and bringing new businesses, activity, vibrancy and economic benefits to the canalside community. The project was recently recognised at the Scottish Government’s Awards for Quality in Planning, taking home the prize for place-based regeneration.

Dave Keane, community links manager at Sustrans Scotland, said: “We are really pleased to be working in partnership with Scottish Canals for further regeneration in Bowling.

“The project has great potential to further attract people to the area, whilst connecting the corridor as a more direct and enjoyable traffic free route. We hope this will encourage people to walk and cycle for more of the journeys they make every day.”

Bowling Harbour’s viaduct swing bridge was constructed in 1896 to carry the Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Railway over the Forth & Clyde Canal. After the railway was abandoned in 1960, the bridge fell into disrepair. Thanks to funding support from Sustrans and Historic Environment Scotland, Scottish Canals has undertaken vital repairs to the structure’s badly corroded metalwork and repainted the entire span.

A short summary video of the transformation of Bowling Harbour so far and a look at its future

The masterplan for the area was shaped by the award-winning Bowling Basin Charrette – a collaborative design programme which saw the local community work with other stakeholders, agencies and industry experts to develop a shared plan for its future. The village is identified by West Dunbartonshire Council as a key regeneration and development priority.

Bowling, which sits on the northern bank of the Firth of Clyde and near the western terminus of the ancient Antonine Wall, was a major transport hub during the Industrial Revolution and was vital to the success of the River Clyde, the Forth & Clyde Canal and the Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Railway.

Amendments made to Union Terrace Gardens designs

Union Terrace Gardens_Rosemount ViaductLDA Design has submitted a raft of refinements to its Union Terrace Gardens proposals following feedback from the public.

The latest plans include a realignment of a proposed new walkway, linking Union Street to the Gardens, to reduce the potential impact on any future development of the adjacent railway line.

Steps have also been taken to provide further protection of the views and setting of the Robert Burns and Edward VII statues through redesign of the proposed buildings nearby.

The scheme refinements are in response to representations made about the detailed planning application submitted earlier this year. LDA Design has also been liaising with Historic Environment Scotland on developing the scheme.

Union Terrace Gardens_refinementsLDA Design, which is working alongside Stallan-Brand on the project, said its imaginative revamp of Aberdeen’s sunken Victorian Gardens respects the unique character and history of this heart-of-the-city space, whilst aiming to make it more social and more usable.

Director Kirstin Taylor, who is leading the project, said: “There’s so much beauty and charm in the Gardens. These amended plans get us even closer to capturing this and enhancing the existing heritage, enabling us to better balance traditional park enjoyment with new ideas and uses.

“We are working closely with all parties to make sure Union Terrace Gardens is a wonderful asset for the city for generations to come, a place where people belong.”

The amendment ensures the agreed six key design principles continue to be met: A preserved and enhanced green space; new and improved facilities; celebrating the heritage; creation of flexible events spaces; accessible Gardens for all; a safe and active space.
It is hoped that planning approval can be obtained as early as February.

Rural tourist sites to benefit from £6m infrastructure fund

The road to Kinlochewe on the North Coast 500. Image: VisitScotland

The road to Kinlochewe on the North Coast 500. Image: VisitScotland

The Scottish Government is to establish a fund to provide investment in infrastructure to support sustainable growth in rural tourism across Scotland.

The Rural Tourism Infrastructure Fund – which will see £6 million invested over two years (2018/19 and 2019/20) – will help ensure the services and facilities tourists and communities need are provided.

Latest figures indicate notable increases in visitor numbers to rural tourism sites in certain areas, including:

  • The North Coast 500 route attracting an extra 29,000 visitors to the Highlands, with the area experiencing a 26% annual rise in visitors compared to a 6% increase across the rest of the region
  • The ‘Outlander effect’ on Historic Environment Scotland sites, with those featuring in the television series continuing to see large annual visitor increases – including 44% for Blackness Castle and a 42% rise at Doune Castle
  • The Isle of Skye continuing to grow in popularity, with Visit Scotland’s Portree centre seeing more than 150,000 tourist visits annually, increasing 5% year-on-year

The new fund will support a wide range of improvement projects – such as parking, camping facilities, recycling points and footpath access.

Expected to launch in early 2018, the fund will be administered by public sector partners working with local authorities, with input from communities and the industry to identify projects requiring support.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: “Scotland’s islands and rural communities attract visitors from across the globe.

“The tourist boom that our country is enjoying is great news. It means more jobs and investment but it can also mean pressure on transport, services and facilities – especially in rural areas. The Scottish Government is determined to help.

“Our new £6m Rural Tourism Infrastructure Fund will take bids from communities and work with local councils to support projects that enable even more people to enjoy Scotland, the most beautiful country in the world.”

New York-inspired High Line path planned as new Forth & Clyde Canal link

An artist’s impression of the proposed linear park – inspired by New York City’s High Line – that could soon grace the top of the revamped Bowling Harbour bridge at the gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal

An artist’s impression of the proposed linear park – inspired by New York City’s High Line – that could soon grace the top of the revamped Bowling Harbour bridge at the gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal

A new linear park inspired by New York City’s High Line could be set for the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal following the restoration of an iconic 120-year-old swing bridge at Bowling Harbour in West Dunbartonshire, according to Scottish Canals.

Bowling Harbour’s viaduct swing bridge was constructed in 1896 to carry the Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Railway over the Forth & Clyde Canal. After the railway was abandoned in 1960, the bridge fell into disrepair. Thanks to funding support from Sustrans and Historic Environment Scotland, Scottish Canals has undertaken vital repairs to the structure’s badly corroded metalwork and repainted the entire span.

The latest stage of a £3.2 million transformation of the area, the completion of the bridge, together with the recent refurbishment of the bridge’s railway arches into commercial units, has ensured the structure will continue to play an important role in the area for years to come.

The transformational work at Bowling Harbour, undertaken in partnership with the local community, has brought new businesses, activity, vibrancy and economic benefits to the canal and celebrated Bowling’s important role in Scotland’s industrial past.

The 120-year-old swing bridge at Bowling Harbour - the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal - has been lovingly restored as part of the latest stage of a £3.2m transformation of the area

The 120-year-old swing bridge at Bowling Harbour – the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal – has been lovingly restored as part of the latest stage of a £3.2m transformation of the area

Helena Huws, design and development manager at Scottish Canals, said: “Over the past few years, we’ve been working with our partners and the local community to breathe new life into Bowling Harbour, investing more than £3.2m in the area. The restoration of the area’s iconic railway bridge to its former glory is the next step in that story and we’re delighted to see the project completed.

“Now we’re looking to deliver the next stages of the masterplan we’ve helped shape with the local community – bringing further investment, employment opportunities and vibrancy to Bowling, and developing a fantastic tourism and leisure destination fitting of the western gateway to the Forth & Clyde Canal.”

Fundraising is now underway for the next stage of development of the viaduct structure – transforming the former railway line into a fully accessible linear park and pathway inspired by New York City’s iconic High Line. This new route will form a direct link between the Forth & Clyde Canal towpath and the National Cycle Network route towards Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park. Detailed proposals have been submitted for planning approval and feature new viewpoints which will offer visitors the chance to enjoy the vistas over the canal and River Clyde.

Tom Bishop, community links manager at Sustrans Scotland, said: “This is an exciting project to work in partnership with Scottish Canals for further regeneration in Bowling.

“It has great potential to further attract cyclists and visitors, whilst connecting the corridor as a more direct and enjoyable traffic free route. We hope this will encourage people to walk and cycle for more of the journeys they make every day.”

A short summary video of the transformation of Bowling Harbour so far and a look at its future

The masterplan for the area was shaped by the award-winning Bowling Basin Charrette – a collaborative design programme which saw the local community work with other stakeholders, agencies and industry experts to develop a shared plan for its future. The village is identified by West Dunbartonshire Council as a key regeneration and development priority.

Councillor Iain McLaren, West Dunbartonshire Council’s convener of infrastructure, regeneration & economic development, said: “The Bowling swing bridge is of real historical importance and it is wonderful to see it restored to its former glory as part of this ambitious project. The work already carried out Bowling Harbour has made it a destination well worth visiting and the plans for further regeneration of the area are extremely exciting.”

Bowling, which sits on the northern bank of the Firth of Clyde and near the western terminus of the ancient Antonine Wall, was a major transport hub during the Industrial Revolution and was vital to the success of the River Clyde, the Forth & Clyde Canal and the Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Railway.

Michael Easson, grants manager at Historic Environment Scotland, said: “We are really pleased to see the successful completion of this first phase of work at Bowling Harbour and hope the restoration of the swing bridge is a catalyst for a wider scheme to conserve and repair the surrounding area.”

Ten new internships created at Scotland’s new conservation centre

HES director of conservation Professor David Mitchell, Deputy First Minister John Swinney and HES chief executive Alex Paterson examine the interactive map display at the Engine Shed

HES director of conservation Professor David Mitchell, Deputy First Minister John Swinney and HES chief executive Alex Paterson examine the interactive map display at the Engine Shed

Deputy First Minister and cabinet secretary for education and skills, John Swinney, welcomed the announcement of ten new internship opportunities with Historic Environment Scotland (HES) as he toured the Engine Shed, Scotland’s new national conservation centre in Stirling.

Each of the ten internships will last at least 12 months, with students based across Stirling, Edinburgh and Fort George. Opportunities are available in a wide variety of conservation areas, including climate change science, conservation science and technical aspects of traditional construction materials.

Mr Swinney said: “The Engine Shed is a great achievement for Historic Environment Scotland in this, our Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology, and presents a huge opportunity for growth in skills across the built heritage sector.

“I very much welcome the creation of these internships which will ensure the skills required to look after our wonderful built heritage continue to thrive and am pleased to hear about the education outreach work being done by the centre.

“This is a great chance to engage children and young people with Scotland’s historic environment and inspire them to consider careers in the sector.”

The Engine Shed, which received £3 million in funding support from the Scottish Government, serves as a base for HES’ building conservation research and education teams, using world-leading innovation to bring Scotland’s built heritage to life through technology and hands-on activities. It was opened in July, welcoming more than 6,000 people in its first six weeks, and seeing children, young people and adults engage in activities relating to stone, stained glass and other traditional materials.

The £11m learning and visitor resource provides education support for learners from primary school to post-graduate level, and facilitates the sharing of HES’ world class expertise with national and international partners.

Historic Environment Scotland’s director of conservation, Professor David Mitchell, said: “As a place for research and learning, we thought it was fitting this year to offer a range of various internships at the Engine Shed, where students can make use of the state-of-the-art resources and pioneering technology housed here. Education is at the core of our internship programme and participants will be mentored by our staff to gain the most from the experience. They will have unique access to some of Scotland’s most treasured places and specialist training at the Engine Shed in its first year of operation.

“We have a long tradition of providing internships in areas of building conservation. The support we get from our partners in facilitating these internships reflects the willingness of our sector to invest in the next generation. These are valuable opportunities for education and learning for early career professionals and we have seen former interns move on to higher education, build successful careers or start their own businesses, which enhances capacity and expertise in the heritage sector.”

As part of the internship programme each successful candidate will have an appointed mentor and host, who will develop a customized learning and training plan for them, which will include access to relevant training courses at the Engine Shed.

Former climate change intern David Harkin said: “My internship with HES allowed me to develop my interest in considering the impacts of a changing climate on Scotland’s historic places. The learning experience and my personal development has allowed me to pursue this specialism as a career.”

People who are interested in applying for an internship, should email a CV and personal statement explaining which internship they are interested in and why they wish to be considered to TraditionalSkills@hes.scot by 12 noon October 20.

Funding announced for Scapa Flow Visitor Centre and Museum revamp

Scapa-Flow-Oil-Tank_950Work on a major renovation of the Scapa Flow Visitor Centre and Museum in Lyness looks set to start in spring next year after the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) approved a grant of up to £1.155 million.

Designed by Studio MB, the project will involve the restoration of the historic buildings, the enhancement of interpretation and displays, and the creation of a new building which will house an exhibition space, café, toilet facilities and information areas.

The HLF support completes a major funding package made up of grants from Historic Environment Scotland, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Orkney Islands Council’s LEADER fund and Capital Projects programme.

Tender documents will be issued towards the end of the year, with work due to start in spring 2018.

The museum is set to re-open in time for the commemoration marking 100 years since the scuttling of the German High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow in 1919.

Councillor Rob Crichton, chair of the council’s education, leisure and housing committee, said: “Attracting such a high level of external funding to this project is a real success story for one of our most fragile island communities. The restoration will not only ensure the future of our collections, but also support the local community in Hoy, which relies on the centre to attract visitors to the island, with more than 14,000 visits in 2016.”

Wilfred Weir, the council’s executive director of education, leisure and housing, said: “This is great news and results from a huge amount of work by colleagues to get to this stage. The renovated museum and visitor centre will be a fantastic asset to Lyness, Hoy and Orkney as a whole and celebrate the importance of Scapa Flow in the history of our country. As well as being a valuable resource for visitors to our islands, it will help preserve artefacts for current and future generations at home here and abroad.”

Lucy Casot, head of the Heritage Lottery Fund in Scotland, added: “Scapa Flow has an internationally important story to tell and thanks to players of the National Lottery, we’re delighted to support a project which will do just that. Rare military equipment from both World Wars, along with stories from some of the 12,000 people once stationed there, will help bring the sheltered harbour’s incredible history back to life, exploring how it shaped the history of travel, trade and maritime warfare.”

Scapa Flow Visitor Centre and Museum is based in wartime naval buildings at Lyness in Hoy. The museum tells the story of the anchorage in World War 1 and World War 2. This is made all the more resonant and powerful by being situated in the unique buildings which were themselves part of the story.

Scapa Flow had strategic importance and was the Royal Navy’s principle fleet anchorage during the two world wars. Lyness became the Naval Headquarters in Orkney during 1919, having been used since 1917 as an oil depot. Work began in the late 1930s to enlarge the base, which housed 12,000 military and civilian personnel by 1940.

The museum is centred around the former fuel oil pumping station. It illustrates the importance of Scapa Flow as a base for the British Fleet through photographs, text, artefacts, films and an audio exhibition plus a collection of large military vehicles, cranes and artillery.

The large exhibits and the audio visual display are housed in one of the oil tanks that once held 12,000 tons of fuel oil for the fleet.

Communities to benefit from new historic building regeneration grant

Leith Theatre

Leith Theatre

The Architectural Heritage Fund (AHF) is expanding its grant-giving programme and has launched a new Scottish Community Development Grant that enables historic building regeneration projects in communities across Scotland.

Thanks to three year funding of up to £200,000 from Historic Environment Scotland (HES), eligible applicants could receive up to £50,000 for regeneration projects in their community, bringing benefits to local areas through the reuse of historic buildings.

Approved projects will have the potential to make a significant positive social impact, offer long-term sustainable uses for historic buildings, and will be clearly and strongly community led.

Thomas Knowles, head of grants at Historic Environment Scotland, said: “The new Scottish Community Development Grant offers opportunities for communities to take the lead on restoring their historic buildings and find a sustainable reuse for them as a modern community-owned asset.

“Projects supported by this new grant have the potential to make a really significant positive social impact, and we’re looking forward to hearing about successful applicants and seeing their projects take shape in the future.”

The Architectural Heritage Fund is a UK-wide registered charity that helps voluntary and community groups to repair and regenerate historic buildings.

David Hunter, an AHF Trustee for Scotland, said: “We are looking for proposals that offer long-term sustainable uses for historic buildings and help build stronger and more cohesive communities. Delivering social enterprise, local business or community services from historic buildings can not only help unlock additional funding sources, but improve the sense of place and wellbeing for a local community.”

Springburn Winter Gardens

Springburn Winter Gardens

The first two grants under the new scheme, totalling £39,500, have just been awarded to Springburn Winter Gardens Trust, to help regenerate the historic glasshouses in North Glasgow, and to the Leith Theatre Trust to help bring the Leith Theatre back to life as a live performance venue in Edinburgh.

Jack Hunter, chair of Leith Theatre Trust said: “It is absolutely fantastic to be awarded this grant to further the work of Leith Theatre Trust. This will help give us the capacity to take the next steps in bringing the theatre back to life – bringing in a design team, helping to fundraise and making sure the local community have the opportunity to get the most out of this neglected public asset.”

Jamie Mallan, chair of Springburn Winter Gardens Trust, said: “Early funding from the Architectural Heritage Fund enabled us to demonstrate the viability of restoring the Winter Gardens, which then helped us go on to win other financial support to make crucial repairs to prevent further deterioration of the building.

“We’re delighted that this new grant offer will enable us to further develop our plans to restore the Winter Gardens. It will help us to deliver our vision of a restored and repurposed Winter Gardens as a community-owned site that delivers crucial services and meet the needs of the people of Springburn and north Glasgow.”

To find out more about the Scottish Community Development Grant and to see if your project might be eligible for support, contact the AHF support officer for Scotland, Gordon Barr, on 0300 121 0341 or gordon.barr@ahfund.org.uk.

Historic Environment Scotland objects to £100m housing plan at Angus hospital site

4347-M-01.drgPlans for a £100 million redevelopment of a former hospital site near Montrose have hit a potential stumbling block after concerns were revealed by Historic Environment Scotland.

The mixed-use development, called Sunnyside Park, will see the former Sunnyside Royal Hospital site in Hillside transformed into housing, retail, commercial development with social housing including affordable, retirement and assisted-living housing in a mixture of apartments and family homes.

Sunnyside Royal Hospital in Hillside closed in 2011 after serving as a mental health centre in rural Angus for 153 years. The site was acquired by Montrose-based Pert Bruce Construction Ltd and Edinburgh based FM Group, under the banner of Sunnyside Estates, from NHS Tayside in a seven figure deal.

The new owners applied for planning permission to build 265 homes in and around the B-listed main buildings having already received permission by Angus Council to demolish eight listed buildings to make way for retirement, supported and affordable housing.

But Historic Environment Scotland has objected to its proposals to level six listed buildings in addition to the likes of the former admin block and chapel.

The government heritage agency said blanket moves to demolish the B-listed nursing accommodation Booth House, fire station, water tank and workshops is “of much more concern”.

“This is the focus of our objection,” said case manager Ian Thomson.

“We welcome the stated commitment to retaining and re-using the Main Building, Hospital Building and Carnegie House, together with their ancillary cricket pavilions and summerhouse.

“However, it would have been helpful if more detailed discussion on the handling of the conversion (even as potential indicative schemes) could have taken place in parallel with these demolition proposals.

“This would have given us more confidence that the loss of certain buildings would allow and enable the retention of others.

“However, this is a discussion which can hopefully take place now.”

Sunnyside Estates completed a justification survey which sought “agreement in principle” from HES to retain the three “primary” buildings.

“All three buildings would be restored allowing the retention and cultural heritage to be preserved and appreciated, and to be utilised and enjoyed by future generations,” it said.

“The high costs associated with the restoration of these fabulous examples of local heritage unfortunately necessitate the sacrifice of other existing buildings.”

David Stewart, director of Sunnyside Estate, added: “Our vision is for a distinctive development which enhances and benefits the local area, sustaining and creating local jobs, has been foremost in our thinking for Sunnyside.”

The development plan indicates the release of around 265 houses, with 140 in the first phase period to 2021, with the remainder to follow within five years.

Funding to complete restoration of landmark Parkhead school

Parkhead_Public_School (1)The restoration of a former school building to be used by Parkhead Housing Association can now be completed after Glasgow City Council approved over £567,000 of new funding.

The B-listed former Parkhead Public School in Westmuir Street is to be revamped to create a local enterprise centre with a mix of community and office space.

Project partners Glasgow Building Preservation Trust, Historic Environment Scotland and Parkhead Housing Association have been working for a number of years on bringing the historic building back to productive use.  Additional previous funding has also come from the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund.

The restoration of the former school building, which has lain vacant since 1990, is part of a wider programme – the Parkhead Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI) – whose second phase has over the past five years delivered investment and improvement to the historic fabric of the area.

Parkhead Public School newThe project was identified as a priority for the THI’s second stage, with works beginning in July 2016. Glasgow Building Preservation Trust is currently overseeing these works, which include repairs to the historic fabric and a fit out of the interior into a local enterprise centre with approximately 15,000 square feet of office space.

Parkhead Housing Association will take ownership of the building once the restoration is complete, and this is expected by Spring 2018.

The funding of £567,824 from the council will allow necessary works, such as structural propping and additional stonework, to take place and complete the building’s restoration.

Councillor Kenny McLean, city convener for neighbourhoods, housing and public realm, said: “The restoration of the former Parkhead Public School is a crucial part of the regeneration of Parkhead Cross and the East End, and this funding from the council will bring economic and environmental benefits to the community as and after the project is complete.  We can look forward to a centre bringing jobs and investment at this fantastic building.”

The Category B-listed Parkhead Public School was constructed in two phases, in 1878 and 1887.